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PRT Treatment in SLP, OT, & PT

PRT (Pivotal Response Treatment) is an important frame of reference for Speech/Language Pathologists, Occupational Therapists and Physical Therapists. PRT uses applied behavioral analysis principles as well as child choice, reinforcing attempts, varying activities, alternating familiar with challenging activities, and direct natural reinforcers. PRT’s transdisciplinary family-centered approach makes it particularly appropriate for allied health therapists.

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PRT shows significantly greater effectiveness for treating Autism Spectrum Disorder than traditional ABA  https://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/docs/koegel_prt_rancomized_controlled_trial_of_prt.pdf and facilitates neuroplasticity in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders PRT NeurogenisisArt.  In addition to its usefulness for addressing language and behavioral challenges related to Autism Spectrum Disorders, PRT is a clinically relevant intervention for addressing other developmental and psychiatric challenges (e..g., fragile x syndrome, cognitive deficits, developmental trauma disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, depression, anxiety). Treatment is done with the family across disciplines in the child’s natural environment, so gains in language and motor skills are generalized to improve functioning.

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PRT strategies can be integrated with language, sensory and movement strategies as a component of occupational, speech and physical therapy interventions SensoryBehavior  I have found PRT is a particularly valuable treatment frame of reference for Speech/Language, Occupational and Physical Therapists.

References

Amaral, D. G., Schumann, C. M., & Nordahl, C. W. (2008). Neuroanatomy of Autism. Trends in Neuroscience, 31(3), 137-145.

Voos, A. C., Pelphrey, K. A., Tirrell, J., Bolling, D. Z., Wyk, B. V., Kaiser, M. D., McPartland, J. C., Volkmar, F. R. (2012). Neural mechanisms of improvements in social motivation after pivotal response treatement: Two case studies. Journal of Autism Dev Disord, 43(1), 1683-1689.