Coping with Mental Health Challenges

Daily coping strategies for prevention along with coping interventions when symptoms are first noticed are extremely useful for managing mental health and behavioral challenges.  Many individuals confront mental health and behavioral challenges at some times in their life. Particularly those experiencing difficulties with substance abuse, extreme stress, developmental disorders or subtle sensory motor disorders (e.g., hyper-responsiveness, hypo-responsiveness, involuntary movements) benefit from regularly using coping strategies to manage their mental health and behavioral challenges. Mental health and behavioral challenges are eventually diagnosed as a depression, anxiety, Autism Spectrum, Post-Traumatic Stress, Borderline Personality, Psychotic or some other disorder that carries a stigma not seen in other illnesses.  While help is available it is up to each person to manage their mental health and behavioral strategies by actively using coping strategies.

The most inexpensive evidence-based coping strategy to reduce distress from mental health and behavioral challenges is doing aerobic exercise 30 minutes daily. The best exercises are the ones that individuals enjoy doing regularly. Any combination of walking, yard work, biking, running, swimming, fitness classes, karate, dance and sports are effective. In addition to lowering distress, aerobic exercise contributes to weight management and physical well-being.

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The second coping strategy that is important for people who experience mental health and behavioral challenges to do daily is a relaxation activity. Relaxation activities include progressive relaxation, visualization, yoga, mindfulness, breathing, meditation, Tai chi, Chi Gong and prayer. Like exercise the best forms are any an individual is motivated to do daily for thirty minutes. Relaxation activities can be reinforced through participating in a weekly group class that can be found for little or no cost.

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Despite the proven benefit of regular exercise and relaxation to reduce mental health and behavioral challenges many people experience problematic mental health and behavioral symptoms anyway, and will need to immediately be assessed for their need of counseling and/or medication as appropriate coping strategies. These coping strategies need to be assessed by a licensed mental health counselor, child/adolescent psychiatrist or adult psychiatrist. It is crucial to quickly find a mental health counselor and psychiatrist you trust. In addition,  some individuals also find it helpful to receive services from a licensed massage therapist for stress reduction or occupational therapist to modify their daily routines and life activities. Many individuals experience mental health and behavioral challenges and benefit from regular use of coping strategies to manage them successfully.

References

Brown, R. P. & Gerbarg, P. L. (2012). The healing power of breath. Boston, MA: Shambhala.

Cramer, S. C., Sur, M., Dobkin, B. H., O’Brien, C., Sanger, T. D., Trojanowski, J. Q. . . . & Vinogradov, S. (2011). Harnessing neuroplasticity for clinical applications. Brain, 134(6), 1591-1609.

Levit-Binnun, N., Davidovitch, M., & Golland, Y. (2013). Sensory and motor secondary symptoms as indicators of brain vulnerability. Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 5, 26. www.jneurodevdisorders.com/content/5/1/26

Perry, B. D. (2009). Examining child maltreatment through a neurodevelopmental lens: Clinical applications of the neurosequential model of therapeutics. Journal of Loss and Trauma, 14(4), 240-255.

Talwar, U. K., Sharma, V., & Singh, R. (2010). Role of Yogic Exercises in Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia. Delhi Psychiatry Journal, 13(1), 117-22.

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