1

Enhancing the Behavior of Students with Autism & Sensory Over-responsivity

Over half of students with Autism Spectrum Disorders have sensory over-responsivity to tactile and auditory stimulation with reduced sensory limbic habituation (Green et al., 2015).  Their lack of habituation makes it physiologically more likely they will become distracted and have difficulty learning. Significant sensory modulation difficulties were related to attention and academic achievement challenges in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and significant sensory modulation difficulties benefit from learning to use coping strategies that improve their attention, learning and behavior in the classroom. Among SBIs (sensory-based interventions) tactile massage intervention a minimum of 15 minutes, twice weekly for 3 months has the greatest research support for improving student behavior and learning (Wan Yunus et al., 2015).

Sensory coping strategies for students with Autism Spectrum Disorders who have sensory over-responsivity begin with teaching students to monitor their energy levels to determine if they are high, medium or low and whether their energy levels are OK for learning.

fab-energy-level-basic

sensmodtolearn

Next, evidence-based environmental adaptations should be tried to minimize auditory (sound absorbing walls, noise canceling headphones, carpeting), visual (halogen lighting, study carols), and tactile distractions (specific seating so they will not accidentally touch peers). Finally, teachers and therapists should try to reduce the pace and volume as well as increase the salience of instructions, and use visual supports as indicated (Ashburner et al., 2008; Kinnealey et al., 2012). Breaks from learning involving deep pressure and linear movement (Murray et al., 2009), such as by having the student pass out books or deliver messages, can also promote learning. Given that over half of students with Autism Spectrum Disorders also demonstrate significant sensory over-responsivity, it is important to teach coping strategies that will maximize their learning. speechaudnevhandouts  ERI2017SBISupplement

References:

Ashburner, J., Ziviani, J., & Rodger, S. (2008). Sensory processing and classroom emotional, behavioral, and educational outcomes in children with autism spectrum disorder. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62, 564–573.    

Green, S. A., Hernandez, L., Tottenham, N., Krasileva, K., Bookheimer, S. Y., & Dapretto, M. (2015). Neurobiology of sensory overresponsivity in youth with autism spectrum disorders. JAMA psychiatry, 72(8), 778-786.

Kinnealey, M., Pfeiffer, B., Miller, J., Roan, C., Shoener, R., & Ellner, M. L. (2012). Effect of classroom modification on attention and engagement of students with autism or dyspraxia. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 66, 511–519.

Murray, M., Baker, P. H., Murray-Slutsky, C., & Paris, B. (2009). Strategies for supporting the sensory-based learner. Preventing School Failure: Alternative Education for Children and Youth53(4), 245-252.

Wan-Yunus, F. W., Liu, K. P., Bissett, M., & Penkala, S. (2015). Sensory-based intervention for children with behavioral problems: a systematic review. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 45(11), 3565-3579.

 

Advertisements