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Special Needs Behavior Plans

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Students with complex behavioral problems including cognitive limitations need to be taught to behave appropriately so they can learn in school. An individualized understanding of the student’s developmental level, trauma history, sensory modulation, and effective coping strategies are helpful in developing a behavior plan. It is helpful to develop a trauma informed behavior plan that addresses the student’s feelings and developmental challenges.

Often “big” feelings need to be managed to prevent problematic behaviors. Visual supports help students become aware of their problematic big feelings. Emotional learning follows a developmental sequence with the first feelings learned being sad, mad, glad, tense and relaxed. Once these are learned more complex and combined emotions can be taught. Emphasis is given to current feelings that lead to problematic behavior. Ask student to use different colors to draw all the feelings “in my head”.

FeelingsinmyHead

Next, feelings which are always O. K. things to feel need to be distinguished from problematic behaviors like hitting, which are not O. K. in school. Particularly with cognitively impaired students desired results are emphasized not morality. It is also helpful to use a trauma informed approach that repeatedly emphasizes “I will like you no matter what. Some behaviors will be rewarded that will make you successful, while other behaviors will be punished so you don’t have a bad life”. A rainbow goal is a useful art activity is used to help the student plan behavior goals.

RainbowGoal

For cognitively impaired students goal planning emphasizes what they want to do “Be safe” rather than what they won’t do “hit”. Each rainbow beneath the top pot of gold goal is a related step. The student can dictate or write, chooses the color, and draws. Participation is encouraged, rather than just scribbling and saying “done”.

Finally a safety plan is visually depicted with objectively specified behaviors for reaching their rainbow goal. The students favorite sensory coping strategy options for replacing the inappropriate behavior are included. Coping strategies are “non-contingent reinforcement (NCR)”, always immediately available options that do not need to be earned. This transdisciplinary behavior plan was developed by the student’s occupational therapist, social worker, and speech/language pathologist.

Visual Safety Plan

The objective behaviors include a definition of “Be safe” that the student and all teachers and therapists understand clearly “No hitting, threatening, or throwing objects”. A baseline is taken and specific point chart or rewards are given for progress toward the goal. Visual supports and art activities can help students with complex behavioral challenges improve their behavior for learning.

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Movement for Mindfulness

Mindfulness is the process of paying attention to what you are currently doing and feeling. Attention is a vital skill that is too often underemphasized, particularly when teaching young and developmentally challenged individuals. Movement strategies are useful for teaching mindfulness, self-control, and attention. Several useful movement strategies are listed below that can help young and developmentally challenged people to be mindful and pay attention better.

Standing Mindful Clock: A movement activity to promote mindfulness and body awareness, especially with people who lack the coordination to use deep breathing for relaxation. It involves verbalizing specific words (designated in bold print) while moving in a specific sequence (described in italics) to promote basic awareness of the front, back, top and bottom of the body. The entire sequence is done 3 times.

Tic squat Tock stand on toes Like a squat Clock stand on toes
‘Till we squat Find our stand on toes Center assume a centered standing position
Tic lean forward Tock lean back Like a lean forward Clock lean back
‘Till we lean forward Find our lean back Center assume a centered standing position

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Tense & relax muscles: A brief progressive relaxation strategy involving the muscles people often tense up when their anxious. Participants tense their muscles for 3 seconds then relax 5-10 seconds, doing each numbered section 3 times.

1) Tense; then relax all the muscles of your face and jaw.
2) Elevate both shoulders towards your ears; then drop and relax both shoulders.
3) Fist hands tightly; then completely relax both wrists, hands & fingers.

Bird: A strategy that uses simple movement to teach deep breathing for relaxation. Gradually lift both arms (from the sides like a jumping jack or straight up vertically) while breathing in and expanding your belly. Then at a slower rate lower both arms while breathing out.

Nose Breathe: A strategy that combines hand stretching with deep breathing for relaxation. The nose breathe strategy is especially helpful for students whose hands feel tense or spasm from handwriting or who have difficulty using breathing for relaxation. The fingers are extended and separated for relaxation, then the thumb is fisted in a mudra hand posture that promotes relaxation. It is done three to six times after the hand motions are learned.
1) Breathe in through your nose (making your belly go out) while opening your hands wide, extending and separating your fingers.
2) At a slower rate breathe out while bringing your thumb inside your hands making fists.

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Focus on Feet: Eyes closed feel one big toe, the smaller toe next to it, center toe, second smallest toe, and little toe. Feel your toes, bend them, notice if you have socks on and whether there are holes in your socks. Move back to feel the ball of your foot, back further and feel the arch of your foot and notice if it hits the ground. Move back again to feel your heel. Finally, feel or press down on the entire bottom of your foot.

Focus on Palms: Put your open hands in Dali Lama prayer position and push them together as hard as possible for 10 seconds doing an isometric contraction. Then position your hands palms up and close your eyes. Feel your thumb, pointer, middle, ring, and little finger. Then feel the palms of your hands for 5-10 seconds.

References:
Brain Gym International http://www.braingym.org
Greenland, S. K. The Mindful Child. http://www.susankaisergreenland.com/
Koester, Ceci http://www.movementbasedlearning.com