0

Sensory-Based Intervention Groups

Sensory-based intervention (SBI) groups can be useful in schools and clinical settings to improve sensory skills, behavior and learning.  SBIs are the guided use of sensory strategies to improve behavior by addressing specific sensory modulation or sensory discrimination challenges.  SBIs are commonly implemented in early intervention, school, and mental health settings through individual, group and consultative interventions. SBIs include directing other professionals in embedding goal-directed sensory activities into a student’s daily routine to improve behavior for learning.

It is important to distinguish occupational therapy utilizing SBIs from Sensory Integration Intervention. While SBIs and Sensory Integration both utilize the theory of sensory integration, they are distinct interventions with unique research efficacy. Sensory integration intervention, also referred to as Ayres Sensory Integration® is a developmental clinic-based, child-led intervention that follows specific core concepts.

SBIs can empower clients to actively substitute the sensory input provided through aggressive, inappropriate and self-injurious behavior with sensory coping strategies and adaptive equipment. SBIs are goal-directed and specifically matched to the client’s needs and preferences. The use of SBIs has been integrated into the evidence-based Greenspan Floortime Approach for Autism Spectrum Disorders, Collaborative Problem Solving Approach for children with oppositional defiant disorder, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for adolescents with borderline personality disorder, and models for reducing restraint and seclusion in mental health facilities and schools a-reducing-restraint-and-seclusion OTPractSchoolOTRedAgg .

The new ESSA “Every Student Succeeds Acts” (2015) potentially expands the role of school therapists in helping at risk students and consulting with parents and teachers to improve school climate.  Under ESSA occupational, physical, speech/language, and school mental health therapists are designated as Specialized Instructional School Personnel (SISP) and given a role in helping at-risk regular education as well as special education students.  SBI’s can be included in interventions to educate students, staff and parents in enhancing student self-regulation school therapist consultations and group leadership.

Effectively using sensory-based interventions (SBIs) to improve functional behavior is different from the more common practice of randomly distributing adaptive equipment or using a single sensory strategy such as brushing for every student in a class. Using SBI adaptive equipment and sensory strategies to optimally promote functional behavior begins with an occupational therapy assessment, developing an individualized functional behavioral goal, gathering baseline data on the goal, and matching the client with the most appropriate individualized environmental adaptation.  Once a specific environmental adaptation has been implemented consistently for a month in conjunction with other professionals, it’s effectiveness is assessed to determine if the environmental adaptation should be continued, modified, or discontinued.

Sensory modulation is the ability to respond to functionally relevant sensory information while screening out irrelevant input.  Simply helping students understand their sensory modulation and/or sensory discrimination differences is an important first step in SBI.  Therapists can begin by discussing sensory modulation “energy levels” as low, medium and high, to help students identify when their energy levels are too high or low for behaving appropriately and learning.  Consistently using the color codes developed by the Zones of Regulation program can be part of the effort in helping students gain a better understanding of how their arousal levels affect their behavior and emotional regulation.

Once students have modulated their energy level, consider and intervene if sensory discrimination disorders are negatively impacting behavior.  When in the quiet alert state some students can still become dysregulated because of sensory discrimination disorders in which they have difficulty distinguishing, interpreting and organizing the information coming in from all their various senses.  For example, sensory discrimination disorder can involve problems organizing and combining information from the pressure, touch, and movement senses to appropriately print the “b”.

Sensory discrimination disorder can occur in any combination of ones sensory systems: tactile (touch), proprioceptive (muscle force/tension), interoceptive (internal organ states such as hung & pain), olfactory (smell), gustatory (taste), auditory, and visual.   it is most widely described in tactile discrimination disorder. A common assessment item regarding tactile discrimination from the Miller Assessment for Preschoolers involves the therapist having a client identify which finger is touched with eyes closed, with consistently accurate identification expected by age 3. Some high school students who are above grade level who had a trauma history and psychiatric disorder were inconsistently able to do this task. This difficulty alerts me to the need of increasing body awareness. Sensory Discrimination Disorders can involve the sense of: touch, proprioception (body awareness), vestibular (movement), vision, sound, taste, and/or smell. Interventions of sensory discrimination disorder are best done after basic sensory modulation has been addressed.

Recent research suggests that interoception can be a significant component of sensory discrimination disorders.  Interoception challenges involve confusion regarding internal body sensations such as hunger, thirst, and pain.  Exploring internal sensations through sensory mindfulness activities can help address interoception.  Research supports that mindfulness activities can be helpful interventions for individuals with somatic pain and post-traumatic stress disorder challenges.

mindfulnessSensory discrimination disorder contributes to difficulties with body awareness, embodiment, and organizational skills. Sensory discrimination disorder is more commonly seen in clients who experience early childhood post-traumatic stress disorder. It is hard to teach self-esteem and respecting others personal boundaries when clients don’t have adequate body awareness.

catsbitx

It is important to help students learn to identify what they are feeling before they yell, hitting others or engage in problematic behavior “because they suddenly feel horrible”.   For students with developmental challenges it can be helpful to combine feeling faces with the color codes from the Zones of Regulation so they can use pictures to identify their negative feelings and arousal level and get assistance with finding self-regulation activities.

SBI involves the use of individualized adaptive equipment to improve specific goal-directed behavior, such as reducing noise and visual distractions with a study carol and noise-canceling headphones to reduce peer conflicts and increase attention.  It can also include massage, mindfulness activities, or embedded classroom tasks involving delivering a box of books for the teacher as a deep pressure movement break.  The most important and often neglected step is to identify and educate students regarding their specific sensory challenges related to behavior, and to reinforce all efforts to self-regulate.

Adaptive Equipment

grpsbi2016 SLIDES

school-therapy SUPPLEMENTAL Therapy in the Schools Slides

 

0

Body Awareness Intervention Improves Behavior

Many adolescents and young adults with behavioral disorders (e.g., Autism Spectrum, Post Traumatic Stress, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Anorexia Nervosa) have body image challenges that negatively impact their behavior and social relationships. This is especially true for individuals who have developmental, mental health, and/or sensory processing challenges. Adolescents and young adults with body awareness challenges can be helped to improve their social skills with body awareness interventions.

Developmentally appropriate body awareness intervention involving massage, touch, movement, relaxation and mindfulness activities can take place within their work, school, home and community recreation activities. Body awareness provides the foundation for mindfulness, meditation and other calming activities that have been shown to decrease depression, anxiety, distress, aggression and addiction. Developmentally individualized body awareness tasks promote the emerging development of self-control using individual and group trauma-informed mindfulness, yoga, relaxation, visualization, massage, sensory processing, and movement activities.

Regardless of their chronological body awareness activities must match the adolescent or adult’s developmental level to be effective. The most developmentally basic and clinically effective experiences of embodiment, based on brain gym activities for special needs www.movementbasedlearning.com www.braingym.org , provide sensory awareness of the front, back, top and bottom of the body. Two activities for providing this experience is the X Marks the Spot movement game

XMarkstheSpot

A second basic body orientation activity is the Roll therapyball on client core progression Strategy, in which a therapist specifically rolls a therapyball sequentially over the center, front, back, top and bottom of the body  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCD9JeFviKY  

Sensory body awareness experiences help develop adolescent and young adults awareness of their body and understanding of body based triggers for early identification of the need for coping strategies.

References

Frank, J. L., Bose, B., & Schrobenhauser-Clonan, A. (2014). Effectiveness of a school-based yoga program on adolescent mental health, stress coping strategies, and attitudes toward violence: Fingdings from a high-risk sample. Journal of Applied School Psychology, 30, 29-49.

Kovacs, M., & Lopez-Duran, N. L. (2012). Contextual emotion regulation therapy: A developmentally-based intervention for pediatric intervention. Child and adolescent psychiatric clinics of North America, 21(2), 327.

Silva, L. M., Schalock, M., & Gabrielsen, K. R. (2015). About face: Evaluating and managing tactile impairment at the time of Autism diagnosis. Autism research and treatment, 2015.

Taylor, S. E., & Stanton, A. L. (2007). Coping resources, coping processes, and mental health. Ann. Rev. Clin. Psychol., 3, 377-401.

 

0

Behavioral, Sensory & Mindfulness Strategies

Positive Behavioral Support (PBS) interventions are used in many schools to improve student behavior and learning.  PBS interventions involve adapting the classroom environment, teaching basic social skills, and rewarding positive behavior to enhance learning. PBS interventions can be enhanced through integrating them with sensory and mindfulness strategies.  Sensory and mindfulness activities are especially useful when using PBS with classes that include young and special needs students.  As an occupational therapist I have found the Second Step, PATHS, and DECA programs helpful in guiding PBS interventions.

Occupational, Speech/Language, Physical and Mental Health therapists can team with regular and special education teachers to implement PBS, sensory and  mindfulness strategies.  Sensory strategies include environmental adaptations and movement activities that enhance learning.  Mindfulness strategies include body awareness, movement, and breathing activities that enhance student’s abilities to pay attention to learning activities.

PBS, sensory and mindfulness strategies teach students self-control by enabling them to be aware of their environmental and body triggers so they can implement coping strategies to avoid inappropriate behavior.  An extremely useful PBS strategy is the PATHS Turtle Technique, where an upset student notices they are becoming upset, stops and breathes to calm down.   The turtle technique can be adapted for students with special needs using the FAB Turtle Technique.  When the student or teacher notices the student reacting to environmental and body triggers they stop what they are doing and go to a pre-designated sensory coping area in the back of the class.  The student does their individualized coping activities for self-calming until they are sure they will no longer act aggressively.  Later, when they are calm the teacher can assist the student with problem solving.

FABTURTLETech

Combining PBS (Positive Behavioral Support), sensory and mindfulness strategies is particularly useful in inclusive classrooms that integrate regular and special education students.  Below is a description of ways to adapt research proven PBS strategies with sensory and mindfulness activities to provide increase individualized structure for students with special needs.

EvidenceBasedBehStrat

0

Environmental Adaptations for Improved Behavior

Environmental adaptations are an important yet underutilized way of helping individuals with behavioral, developmental, and sensory modulation challenges. While environmental adaptations are often included in positive behavioral support and relaxation programs, they are not given sufficient attention. A third of children with significant sensory modulation differences were found to have major psychiatric diagnoses http://www.fyiliving.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/re-examiningsensoryregulation.pdf Individualizing and teaching clients to use sensory environmental adaptations can significantly improve their behavior and decrease stress at school, work and home.

Environmental adaptations can provide structure and offer coping strategies that significantly reduce anxiety and improve behavior. Environmental adaptations include both the generalized and specific use of adaptive equipment and techniques. Generalized adaptive equipment and techniques such as assigned seats, reduced noise levels, posted rules and coping strategy bulletin boards provide structure for improved behavior.

WallPushBulBrdClassRules

An important guideline is to increase environmental structure before increasing behavioral demands, such as beginning more academically challenging learning activities. Likewise, reducing behavioral demands can be helpful in less structured environments. When clients first begin showing anxiety or behavioral difficulties, assess if the environmental supports match the demands being made and adjust environmental adaptations accordingly.

Some clients with significant behavioral, developmental, and sensory processing challenges benefit from individualized adaptive equipment and techniques such as study carols, noise canceling head phones, and being directed to do one activity for a minimum of five minutes before cleaning up and selecting another task. Research shows that adaptive equipment helps all children feel more comfortable in stressful environments, but the effects were significantly greater for children with developmental disabilities http://www.aamse.us/sites/default/files/Influence_Adapted.pdf

Adaptive Equipmentcropped-coping.jpgCopingCardChairleg Theraband

Specific environmental adaptations are most effective when they are individualized to meet the client’s behavioral goals and sensory needs. It is helpful to introduce environmental adaptations one at a time for a two-week period after practicing their use for goal achievement.

A Sensory Functional Behavioral Analysis, FAB Trigger & Coping forms, Sensory Profile, and goal-related base line data can be useful for finding the most effective environmental adaptations and tracking their effectiveness.

FABTriggerCopingFormsMasterpgno3FABTriggerCopingFormsMasterPg4FABTriggerCopingFormsMasterpgno5         It is important to clearly explain the rules for continued access to environmental adaptations before introducing them (e.g., gum chewing will be allowed only if students consistently throw their gum in the garbage when they are finished with it). Specifically considering and teaching clients to use environmental adaptations significantly improves their effectiveness for individuals with behavioral, sensory processing and developmental challenges.

1

FAB Coping Card Strategy

The FAB Coping card gives clients, teachers and therapists a visual support strategy for achieving their goals. Based on Power Cards, coping cards use the child’s preferred interest to guide goal-directed behavior. Clients use an index card to depict their preferred interest, behavioral goal, coping strategies, and reinforcement schedule. Constructing and displaying the coping card focuses the client and staff on their individual goal, coping strategies, and reinforcement schedule while using their preferred interest to help achieve the goal.

For example, a student who frequently bit his hand constructed a coping card by depicting his goal (e.g., keep safe hands by not biting myself when I get upset), preferred interest (e.g., Sponge Bob), coping strategies (e.g., chewy, weighted blanket, and basket ball) and reinforcement schedule (e.g., 10 minutes of safe hands=1 sticker). The goal is written and/or drawn, stickers or drawings depict the preferred interest, and coping strategies are visually represented (colored, cut out, and pasted on an index card using the FAB Trigger & Coping forms).

FAB Coping CardFABTriggerCopingFormsMasterpgno5

 

FABTriggerCopingFormsMasterpgno3FABTriggerCopingFormsMasterPg4

On the reverse side of the coping card the reinforcement schedule is written: “Safe hands for 10 consecutive minutes earns one sticker, while five stickers=1 toy car)”.  The index card is laminated and fastened to the desktop or worn as a necklace. Through their process of constructing the coping card clients and staff develop an effective functional goal, preferred interest, coping strategies, and reinforcement schedule.

Making a coping card helps teach clients how to use adaptive equipment to achieve their goal. The process of constructing the coping card focuses the client and staff on the goal and plan for achieving it.  The coping card helps to quickly remind clients and staff of the individualized program for achieving their goal.  Coping cards quickly guide busy teachers and therapists in addressing functional goals of students with significant behavioral challenges. Coping cards also encourage professional collaboration in goal development and implementation.

Reference:

Spencer, V., Simpson, C., Day, M., Buster, E. (2008).  Using the power card strategy to teach social skills to a child with Autism.  Teaching Exceptional Children Plus, 5(1), 1-10.

1

Movement for Mindfulness

Mindfulness is the process of paying attention to what you are currently doing and feeling. Attention is a vital skill that is too often underemphasized, particularly when teaching young and developmentally challenged individuals. Movement strategies are useful for teaching mindfulness, self-control, and attention. Several useful movement strategies are listed below that can help young and developmentally challenged people to be mindful and pay attention better.

Standing Mindful Clock: A movement activity to promote mindfulness and body awareness, especially with people who lack the coordination to use deep breathing for relaxation. It involves verbalizing specific words (designated in bold print) while moving in a specific sequence (described in italics) to promote basic awareness of the front, back, top and bottom of the body. The entire sequence is done 3 times.

Tic squat Tock stand on toes Like a squat Clock stand on toes
‘Till we squat Find our stand on toes Center assume a centered standing position
Tic lean forward Tock lean back Like a lean forward Clock lean back
‘Till we lean forward Find our lean back Center assume a centered standing position

MindfulClk3MindfulClk4

Tense & relax muscles: A brief progressive relaxation strategy involving the muscles people often tense up when their anxious. Participants tense their muscles for 3 seconds then relax 5-10 seconds, doing each numbered section 3 times.

1) Tense; then relax all the muscles of your face and jaw.
2) Elevate both shoulders towards your ears; then drop and relax both shoulders.
3) Fist hands tightly; then completely relax both wrists, hands & fingers.

Bird: A strategy that uses simple movement to teach deep breathing for relaxation. Gradually lift both arms (from the sides like a jumping jack or straight up vertically) while breathing in and expanding your belly. Then at a slower rate lower both arms while breathing out.

Nose Breathe: A strategy that combines hand stretching with deep breathing for relaxation. The nose breathe strategy is especially helpful for students whose hands feel tense or spasm from handwriting or who have difficulty using breathing for relaxation. The fingers are extended and separated for relaxation, then the thumb is fisted in a mudra hand posture that promotes relaxation. It is done three to six times after the hand motions are learned.
1) Breathe in through your nose (making your belly go out) while opening your hands wide, extending and separating your fingers.
2) At a slower rate breathe out while bringing your thumb inside your hands making fists.

MindfulClk1MindfulClk2

Focus on Feet: Eyes closed feel one big toe, the smaller toe next to it, center toe, second smallest toe, and little toe. Feel your toes, bend them, notice if you have socks on and whether there are holes in your socks. Move back to feel the ball of your foot, back further and feel the arch of your foot and notice if it hits the ground. Move back again to feel your heel. Finally, feel or press down on the entire bottom of your foot.

Focus on Palms: Put your open hands in Dali Lama prayer position and push them together as hard as possible for 10 seconds doing an isometric contraction. Then position your hands palms up and close your eyes. Feel your thumb, pointer, middle, ring, and little finger. Then feel the palms of your hands for 5-10 seconds.

References:
Brain Gym International http://www.braingym.org
Greenland, S. K. The Mindful Child. http://www.susankaisergreenland.com/
Koester, Ceci http://www.movementbasedlearning.com